Saturday, December 20, 2008

Top 10,000 words in Dutch, English, French, and German

This page has lists of the top 10,000 words in each of Dutch, English, French, and German. As the page is in German, I've put together a little table to take you directly to the lists. The lists unfortunately do not have translations.

After the jump, the table and a another word frequency list for French.

DutchTop 100Top 1,000Top 10,000
EnglishTop 100Top 1,000Top 10,000
FrenchTop 100Top 1,000Top 10,000
GermanTop 100Top 1,000Top 10,000

About.com has a top-100 word frequency list for French here. In contrast to the lists above, About.com's does have English translations.

25 comments:

  1. This is really helpful - but a word of warning: these lists are obviously based on print sources (likely newspapers), not on spoken language. Still helpful but the distribution will probably be biased on the side of formal language. Thanks for the easy links!!!! :-)

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  2. Very true, and it's a problem with most frequency lists. Frequency lists that include spoken speech are much rarer because it's a heckuva lot harder to get speech into lists; you need to have some way to get the spoken word put into a database, which can be quite a hassle whether you're recording, using speech recognition software, or just writing it down.

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  3. There are duplicates in these lists, or at least the English list.

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  4. There are duplicates in these lists.anyway thanks.

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  5. This is human nature ....to find first the flaws, then the good parts. Take it as it is guys, improve it and post it yourselfs.
    Congrats for the lists! Nice Job!

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  6. These lists have been a good help, but I find ones based on TV subtitles rather than print sources better. That's an easy way you can get something that approximates real speech. I haven't managed to find this for Dutch though, only for Spanish. Here's the Spanish one for anyone interested:


    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wiktionary:Frequency_lists#Spanish

    The Dutch list has "the"  at least twice (it has "The" and "the). As far as I know, "the" is not a Dutch word and wiktionary isn't turning up any Dutch results. I think this is from when Dutch news sources quote organizations and keep their name in English.  It also has several nationalities (Belgische, Amerikaanse) and acronyms (CDA), which makes the list a lot harder to wade through...
    Other English words that have crept somehow in are "many" and "workshops". I could see the latter italicized as an English word in many publications, but I don't see how "many" got in.

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  7. Pablo FernandezramosJun 1, 2012, 7:10:00 PM

    Excellent source.
    Great job.

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  8. how are we to know what the word means? you should put what the word is in english

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  9. Well, you'd have to look the words up, of course!



    Naturally you're right that a list with translations (that you could just dump into Anki or the like) would be most convenient.  Unfortunately, those are not quite as easy to come by, but if you know of any please share the link.

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  10.  

    Your blog is really informative to learn french language. I
    am beginner of learning french .French language is romance language. I love to learn new french word everyday. I have great resources for learning french  language. I have got many ideas to learn french
    . Thanks for sharing your experience with us. I have bookmarked this site and i
    will get back here to learn another lessons. Thanks again .

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  11. I'm not too surprised to see "the"; it'd creep into a language just like things like "Les" of "Les Misérables" would creep into English.  Same with "workshops", for the reason you state, but "many" does seem odd. It's not like it has the commonness of "the" or the jargon usage of "workshops".

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  12. This is great. I've seen the top 100 lists before, but if you memorize 20 words per day then you quickly exhaust such a list. I'm learning German and the top 10,000 list is awesome. Thanks so much for putting this together.

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  13. One problem with the Dutch list is that it lists capitalized words separately ; een and Een are separate words in its mind

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  14. Agreed, that's a pain. But if you copy and paste the list into a spreadsheet, you can use formulas to locate such combinations, merge them and then resort the list. It could be complicated if there are words that could mean something different depending on capitalization, such as "Al" (the boy's name) and "al" (the first word in "al Qaida") in English, which is probably why they didn't bother to deal with it in the list.

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  15. Thanks for your great information, the contents are quiet interesting.I will be waiting for your next post.
    French tutor

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  16. The Top 10,000 German word list is useful but it needs some work to turn it into a "learn these words" list.

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  17. There is no dutch word for 'workshops'. The Dutch language is a restricted language when it comes to vocabulary, many English words are imported in Dutch, especially words describing new phenomena like 'workshops'.

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  18. These lists are horrible.

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  19. Contains non-words such as aoun, afterward, bakker, canceled, etc

    Hasn't even been run through a spell-checker. Includes many American words.

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  20. it would be outstanding to have the sound (pronunciation for 100, 1000 list :)

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  21. I'm sharing a list of 1000+ German nouns (with English translations and explanatory notes to such translations) that I wrote out from SPIEGEL and other German newspapers. These nouns are some of the more useful ones that I came across in spring of 2014, as I began to read the German press and put together what has now become a Mega Word List with over 19000 words. Here's the link where the list can be downloaded: https://germanwordlist.wordpress.com/

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  22. how did you compile this list (of 10,000 most Common German Words)? I would be really grateful if you could list the source!

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